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NOTE: This article is updated annually after the conclusion of each PGA TOUR, LPGA Tour and World Long Driver Championship season once all the data becomes available.

When it comes to hitting the ball farther, a lot of golfers realize that technique is important. In recent years, the larger golfing public is also beginning to recognize the importance of getting custom fit for their driver in order to maximize driving distance and their overall average golf swing speed.

However, there’s another way to get more distance that many golfers, even tour players, don’t even know realize is possible or, if they do, they haven’t really gleaned on to what the big keys are to get drastic and rapid gains…swing speed training. Now, I’ll talk about swing speed training and how you can increase your swing speed later on down the page, but to start, let’s simply get started discussing swing speed in general.

First of all, how important is your average golf swing speed?

It’s very important.

Simply put, the more swing speed you have, the farther you’ll hit the ball.

Take a look at this 2017 chart of the average swing speeds for various categories of golfers.

This chart is an average golf swing speed chart showing the different categories of golfers: female amateur, male amateur, LPGA TOUR player, PGA TOUR player, long driver, and the World Long Drive Championship record.

As I’m sure you can imagine, the World Championship Record for club head speed of 157 mph by Mitch Grassing in 2017 would hit the ball much farther than if he had the swing speeds of the PGA TOUR or LPGA TOUR players, who in turn would hit the ball much farther than amateurs with their given swing speeds.

Here’s a little more detail to illustrate the correlation between driving distance and swing speed.
This golf swing speed chart shows the approximate carry distance for each golf club for different driver swing speeds.

But guess what?

Not only does more swing speed help you hit the ball farther, research shows there is a direct correlation between your driving distance (and club head speed) and handicap (and thus scoring).

You can see this in 2017-2019 Arccos data published by MyGolfSpy in 2020 that shows the difference in driving distance by handicap group.

Average Driving Distance By Handicap

https://www.SwingManGolf.com

Handicap

2017

2018

2019

0-5 244 245 243
6-10 231 232 230
11-15 221 220 219
16-20 210 210 209
21-25 201 202 201

Trackman® research also shows that there is a direct correlation between your club head speed and your handicap (and thus scoring).

This chart illustrates the direct correlation between average golf swing speed and handicap or scoring
So, basically, although swing technique, ball striking, and equipment fitting are all important to distance and scoring…simply put, if you want to be a longer or better player or both, you must also have more swing speed.


Let’s drill down and take a look at some other club head speed numbers.

How Fast Is An Amateur’s Average Golf Swing Speed?

Regarding male amateurs, since 2005, the United States Golf Association (USGA) reports that the average handicap has been between 14 and 15. Golf Handicap and Information Network (GHIN) shows similar numbers of 15.3 handicap in 2003 and 14.3 handicap in 2012.

For these average male golfers, Trackman® statistics report the average club head speed at this 14-15-handicap level is about 93.4 mph…yielding an average total distance of 214 yards per drive. That makes the average male amateur driving efficiency to be 2.29 yards per mph of club head speed.

We estimate the average amateur women run in the region of 78 mph and 167-yard drives. Some women we’ve seen are in the mid to high 40s.

How Fast Is A Tour Player’s Average Golf Swing Speed?

Since 2007, the PGA TOUR has been tracking golf swing speeds of all of its players, also using Trackman®.

Year

Average Swing Speed

Average Driving Distance

Driving Distance Efficiency

2007 112.37 288.6 2.57
2008 112.33 287.3 2.56
2009 111.69 287.9 2.58
2010 112.63 287.3 2.55
2011 112.83 290.9 2.58
2012 113.02 289.1 2.56
2013 113.15 287.2 2.54
2014 113.02 288.8 2.56
2015 113.25 289.7 2.56
2016 112.88 290.0 2.57
2017 113.85 292.5 2.57
2018 113.74 296.1 2.60
2019 114.17 293.9 2.57
2020 114.01 296.4 2.60
2021 114.42 296.2 2.59
2022 114.60 299.8 2.62
2023 115.08 299.9 2.61

As you can see at the end of the 2022-2023 PGA TOUR season, the tour average runs about 115.80 mph and they hit about 299.9 yards/drive, which means their driving efficiency is about 2.61 yards/drive. This is much better than the average 14-15 –handicap golfer who comes in at 2.29 yards/drive. If you think about it, this makes sense because professionals hit the ball more consistently around the sweet spot.

Tom Stickney has done some impact testing for GolfWRX. Here’s what a tour player’s striking pattern looked like after about 10 shots.

tour players striking pattern after 10 shots

Compare that to the impact dispersion after only 5 shots from the 15-handicap golfer he tested.

amateur players striking pattern after 10 shots

As you can see, striking the ball consistently solid will help get you more distance out of your club head speed and improve your driving efficiency. If the average amateur had the same 2.61 yards/mph driving efficiency as the average PGA TOUR player, he would average 245 yards/drive instead of only 214 yards/drive.

That means the average amateur could pick up over 30 yards simply from more consistent strikes.


QUICK TIP: If you want to a relatively inexpensive and pretty easy way to work on your contact, practice on the driving range with a little foot powder spray. It wipes off easily with a towel and you can see where the ball struck the club face. If you’ve got some money to spare, it’s also worth it to go through a custom club fitting with a club fitter who is brand agnostic and has a lot of inventory to use for testing. The right combo of components (grip, shaft, head) can make a surprisingly big difference in your ball striking consistency.

2022-2023 PGA TOUR Player Swing Speed Chart – The Slowest Swingers

Anyway, here is a selection of the swing speeds for the 2021-2022 season for some of the slowest PGA TOUR Players. These guys are definitely at a disadvantage on tour speed-wise.

If only they knew it didn’t have to be that way!

Swing Speed Rank

PGA TOUR Player

Average Swing Speed

135 Hank Lebioda 112.85
136 Robby Shelton 112.83
137 Webb Simpson 112.82
138 Jason Dufner 112.81
139 J.T. Poston 112.79
140 Richy Werenski 112.74
140 Brandon Wu 112.74
142 J.J. Spaun 112.72
143 Sepp Straka 112.68
144 Denny McCarthy 112.67
145 Doug Ghim 112.65
146 Emiliano Grillo 112.62
147 Jonathan Byrd 112.54
148 Kramer Hickok 112.44
149 Tom Kim 112.40
150 Aaron Baddeley 112.20
151 Chad Ramey 112.06
152 Nick Taylor 112.05
153 Sean O’Hair 111.96
154 Joel Dahmen 111.94
155 Andrew Putnam 111.83
156 Chris Kirk 111.82
157 Carson Young 111.76
158 Tyler Duncan 111.75
159 Nate Lashley 111.69
160 Sung Kang 111.68
161 Christiaan Bezuidenhout 111.52
162 Danny Willett 111.49
163 Lucas Glover 111.30
164 C.T. Pan 111.06
165 Russell Henley 110.86
166 Zac Blair 110.72
167 Greyson Sigg 110.55
168 Matt Kuchar 110.46
169 David Lipsky 110.34
170 Scott Piercy 110.25
171 Jim Herman 110.23
172 Troy Merritt 110.09
173 Brian Harman 110.08
174 Harrison Endycott 109.96
175 Adam Long 109.95
176 Russell Knox 109.86
177 Cameron Percy 109.69
178 Max McGreevy 109.57
179 Chris Stroud 109.33
180 Andrew Landry 108.79
181 Brice Garnett 108.55
182 Kelly Kraft 108.38
183 Zach Johnson 108.27
184 Austin Cook 108.07
185 Satoshi Kodaira 107.90
186 Chez Reavie 107.87
187 Paul Haley II 107.58
188 William McGirt 107.41
189 Brendon Todd 107.34
190 Ryan Moore 106.78
191 David Lingmerth 106.38
192 Ryan Armour 105.76
193 (slowest) Brian Stuard 103.30

2022-2023 PGA TOUR Player Swing Speed Chart – The Average Swingers

Next are the guys who are considered to be in the middle of the pack as far as swing speed goes on the PGA TOUR. These guys aren’t hurting for speed, but they could definitely use more.

Swing Speed Rank

PGA TOUR Player

Average Swing Speed

69 Matt Fitzpatrick 116.97
70 Dylan Frittelli 116.83
71 Stephan Jaeger 116.74
72 Jordan Spieth 116.61
73 Ben Griffin 116.55
74 Justin Suh 116.44
75 Rickie Fowler 116.32
75 Justin Thomas 116.32
77 Corey Conners 116.28
78 S.Y. Noh 116.20
79 Cody Gribble 116.19
80 Harris English 116.15
80 Tyrrell Hatton 116.15
82 Matt Wallace 116.05
83 Harry Higgs 115.95
84 Harry Hall 115.89
85 Akshay Bhatia 115.82
86 Shane Lowry 115.78
87 Lee Hodges 115.66
88 Michael Kim 115.61
89 Jimmy Walker 115.55
90 Kevin Chappell 115.52
91 Stewart Cink 115.46
91 Scott Stallings 115.46
93 Charley Hoffman 115.42
93 Ben Martin 115.42
95 Eric Cole 115.39
96 Justin Rose 115.37
96 Robert Streb 115.37
98 K.H. Lee 115.27
99 Alex Smalley 115.23
100 Keegan Bradley 115.18
101 Matthias Schwab 115.12
102 Mackenzie Hughes 115.11
103 Mark Hubbard 115.06
104 Adam Svensson 115.00
105 Tyson Alexander 114.85
106 Beau Hossler 114.83
107 Sam Ryder 114.70
108 Matt NeSmith 114.60
109 Wesley Bryan 114.59
110 Peter Malnati 114.45
111 Hideki Matsuyama 114.40
112 Hayden Buckley 114.30
112 Henrik Norlander 114.30
114 Collin Morikawa 114.26
115 Patton Kizzire 114.15
116 Aaron Rai 114.14
117 Andrew Novak 114.02
118 Doc Redman 114.00
119 Sungjae Im 113.97
119 Ryan Palmer 113.97
121 James Hahn 113.93
122 Tom Hoge 113.79
123 Chesson Hadley 113.71
124 Austin Smotherman 113.69
125 Si Woo Kim 113.49
126 Austin Eckroat 113.48
127 Martin Laird 113.43
127 Justin Lower 113.43
129 Billy Horschel 113.39
130 Dylan Wu 113.24
131 Adam Hadwin 113.14
132 Ryan Gerard 113.05
133 Kevin Streelman 113.04
134 Nico Echavarria 113.00

2022-2023 PGA TOUR Player Swing Speed Chart – The Fast Swingers

Lastly are the guys with the fastest speeds. These guys definitely swing fast by PGA TOUR standards. But as we’ll see in a moment, they are actually still quite slow relative to the competitors in the World Long Drive Championships.

Swing Speed Rank

PGA TOUR Player

Average Swing Speed

1 Brandon Matthews 126.51
2 Cameron Champ 126.07
3 Will Gordon 124.84
4 Kyle Westmoreland 124.33
5 Wyndham Clark 123.46
6 Cameron Young 123.15
7 Rory McIlroy 122.80
8 Brent Grant 122.77
9 Lucas Herbert 122.41
10 Gary Woodland 122.16
11 Joseph Bramlett 121.98
12 Callum Tarren 121.95
13 Kurt Kitayama 121.93
14 Taylor Montgomery 121.87
15 Vincent Norrman 121.77
16 Adam Schenk 121.68
17 Thomas Detry 121.62
18 Kevin Tway 121.56
19 Peter Kuest 121.28
20 Trey Mullinax 121.24
21 Adam Scott 121.09
22 Luke List 120.98
23 Scottie Scheffler 120.86
24 Ryan Brehm 120.61
25 Ludvig Åberg 120.26
26 Trevor Cone 120.24
26 MJ Daffue 120.24
28 Xander Schauffele 120.21
29 Matti Schmid 120.12
30 Max Homa 119.82
31 Jon Rahm 119.68
32 Kevin Yu 119.63
33 Garrick Higgo 119.58
34 Patrick Rodgers 119.49
35 Sam Stevens 119.47
36 Sam Burns 119.38
37 Trevor Werbylo 119.32
38 Scott Harrington 119.24
39 Michael Gligic 119.22
39 Augusto Núñez 119.22
41 Byeong Hun An 119.06
42 Keith Mitchell 118.94
42 Kevin Roy 118.94
44 Jason Day 118.65
45 Taylor Pendrith 118.58
46 Nicolai Hojgaard 118.54
47 Tano Goya 118.43
48 Davis Thompson 118.25
49 Zecheng Dou 118.22
50 Viktor Hovland 118.21
50 Carl Yuan 118.21
52 Taylor Moore 118.18
53 Tony Finau 118.03
54 Erik van Rooyen 117.91
55 Patrick Cantlay 117.86
56 Nick Hardy 117.82
56 Nick Watney 117.82
58 Alex Noren 117.67
59 Seamus Power 117.62
60 Cam Davis 117.53
61 Lanto Griffin 117.49
62 Ben Taylor 117.43
63 Tommy Fleetwood 117.33
64 S.H. Kim 117.32
65 Davis Riley 117.29
66 Martin Trainer 117.22
67 Sahith Theegala 117.20
68 Maverick McNealy 117.02

Interestingly, the 2020-2021 season was the first time on the PGA TOUR that a player averaged over 130 mph.

Bryson DeChambeau made a lot of news during COVID-19 by putting on an estimated 40 pounds of fat and muscle weight to gain that swing speed. It worked, but as I wrote about over at GOLFWRX, you don’t need to put on that much weight to gain that much speed. In fact, you can put on more speed in less time without putting on anywhere near that kind of weight.

That’s part of what we do here at Swing Man Golf with what’s available in All-Access.

START NOW WITH ALL-ACCESS

2008 European Tour Player Swing Speed Chart

At the moment, the European Tour (now the DP World Tour) doesn’t post average club head speeds for the tour. However, we did come across a document from a single event in 2008 containing the swing speed of each player in the field. We’re not sure which hole or event these were measured with using Flightscope, but the numbers were interesting.

Here are several notable players.

The event average was 111 mph, which is more or less what we saw on the PGA TOUR in the same year.

Name

Club Head Speed

Álvaro Quiros 125 mph
Rory McIlroy 118 mph
Martin Kaymer 116 mph
Louis Oosthuizen 116 mph
Lee Westwood 115 mph
Darren Clarke 111 mph
Rafael Jacquelin 108 mph
Colin Montgomerie 107 mph
Thongchai Jaidee 105 mph

In 2023, the median player on the DP World Tour averaged 301.08 off the tee. If we assume that they have the same efficiency of PGA TOUR players at 2.62 yards/drive, that would put their 2022 average swing speed at 114.92. That increase from 111 to 115 correlates similarly to the increase that the PGA TOUR made over the same time period since 2008.

Wilco Nienaber led the DP World’s Tour’s driving distance category at 332.10 yards/drive. If we assume his driving efficiency is also 2.61 yard/mph like the PGA TOUR average, that would put Wilco’s on-course average swing speed at 127.24 mph.

For purposes of our swing speed data research, would you mind telling us a little about yourself?

We will keep this information private. We’ll also send you some free follow-up info via email, which you can easily opt-out of at the bottom of the message if you decide it’s not for you.






Let’s take a look at some more specific club head speed numbers.

How fast are LPGA Tour players?

A Trackman chart I have from 2011 shows that LPGA tour players averaged 246 yards/drive with 139 mph ball speed. Assuming 1.5 smash factor, that’s 2.66 yards/mph, far more efficient than the PGA TOUR’s 2.61 yards/mph. That seemed about right as the LPGA Tour mean driving distance as reported by the tour in 2011 was 248.02 yard/drive.

In 2023, the LPGA tour mean was 256.75 yards/drive. Somehow, driving distance Is about 9 yards farther now. Have club head speeds gone up? Is equipment fitting better? Have the players become more efficient? Are course conditions different? I don’t know exactly what is causing the difference, but something has changed.

When Annika Sorenstam was invited to play in the PGA TOUR’s 2003 Bank of America Colonial tournament, she averaged almost 270 yards/drive that year. The PGA TOUR average that year was 285.9 yards/drive and Annika was long enough to be ahead of the PGA TOUR’s 189th ranked Corey Pavin at 268.9 yards/drive and Loren Roberts at 265.9 yards/drive. She nearly made the cut and even beat some of the men in the field. It would have been interesting to know how well she would have done had she been even just a few mph faster with her swing speed…which is certainly doable.

The shortest player on the PGA TOUR in 2023 was Brian Stuard at 271.5 yards/dive. There were 10 LPGA players over that mark…Mel Reid, Madalene Sagstrom, Emily Kristine Pederson, Yuka Saso, Bailey Tardy, Maria Fassi, Yan Liu, Bianca Danganan, Xiaowen Yin, and Polly Mack.

However, only two PGA TOUR players were under 280.0, David Lingmerth at 278.5 and Brian Stuard. Going by David Lingmerth, only Polly Mack was long enough to be on the PGA TOUR distance-wise.

Polly Mack is conceivably as fast as some male professional golfers. However, her 2023 scoring average of 72.30 from the much shorter tees of the LPGA would not be good enough to match the 70.49 scoring average of the 125th ranked player (the highest ranked player to still retain full playing privileges) on the PGA TOUR, who also play from farther distances. She has the distance…she just has other gaps in her game.

2023 LPGA Swing Speed Chart

Since we have to make some guesses about LPGA Tour swing speed data, here is what LPGA Tour numbers might look like assuming both the 2011 reported Trackman efficiency of 2.66 yards/mph versus 2.73 yard/mph, which assumes no increase in club head speed but factoring in the increased 2023 tour driving distance mean of 256.75 yards/drive.

Driving Distance Rank LPGA Player Driving Distance Club Head Speed (2.66 yards/mph) Club Head Speed (2.73 yards/mph)
1 Polly Mack 281.750 106 103
2 Xiaowen Yin 277.264 104 102
3 Bianca Pagdanganan 275.736 104 101
4 Yan Liu 274.179 103 100
5 Maria Fassi 273.653 103 100
6 Bailey Tardy 272.794 103 100
7 Yuka Saso 272.685 103 100
8 Emily Kristine Pedersen 272.463 102 100
9 Madelene Sagstrom 272.333 102 100
10 Mel Reid 272.291 102 100
11 Lexi Thompson 271.419 102 99
12 Yealimi Noh 271.235 102 99
13 Pauline Roussin-Bouchard 269.604 101 99
14 Nelly Korda 268.978 101 99
15 Linn Grant 268.534 101 98
16 Perrine Delacour 268.031 101 98
17 A Lim Kim 267.816 101 98
18 Carlota Ciganda 267.387 101 98
19 Frida Kinhult 267.360 101 98
20 Alison Lee 267.230 100 98
21 Atthaya Thitikul 266.347 100 98
22 Luna Sobron Galmes 265.919 100 97
23 Manon De Roey 265.694 100 97
24 Brooke M. Henderson 265.475 100 97
25 Weiwei Zhang 275.474 104 101
26 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 265.292 100 97
27 Riley Rennell 264.794 100 97
28 Sei Young Kim 264.504 99 97
29 Stephanie Kyriacou 264.480 99 97
30 Charley Hull 264.375 99 97
31 Ruoning Yin 264.058 99 97
32 Ellinor Sudow 264.057 99 97
33 Minjee Lee 263.944 99 97
34 Yu Liu 263.463 99 97
35 Amanda Doherty 263.443 99 96
36 Minami Katsu 263.439 99 96
37 Lauren Hartlage 263.431 99 96
38 Ally Ewing 263.368 99 96
39 Jennifer Kupcho 263.314 99 96
40 Peiyun Chien 263.081 99 96
41 Ana Belac 263.022 99 96
42 Gaby Lopez 262.677 99 96
43 Angel Yin 262.325 99 96
44 Patty Tavatanakit 262.196 99 96
45 Daniela Darquea 262.073 99 96
46 Linnea Strom 261.705 98 96
47 Chanettee Wannasaen 261.637 98 96
48 Dewi Weber 261.633 98 96
49 Sofia Garcia 261.534 98 96
50 Mariajo Uribe 261.480 98 96
51 Brooke Matthews 261.431 98 95
52 Matilda Castren 261.251 98 95
53 Hyun Kyung Park 261.088 98 95
54 Jasmine Suwannapura 261.014 98 95
55 Caroline Inglis 260.986 98 95
56 Lee-Anne Pace 260.926 98 95
57 Stacy Lewis 260.900 98 95
58 Sei Young Kim 260.816 98 95
59 Lindsey Weaver 260.804 98 95
60 Maura Shirley 260.698 98 95
61 Yae Eun Hong 260.687 98 95
62 Heeyoung Park 260.684 98 95
63 Esther Henseleit 260.541 98 94
64 Linnea Johansson 260.540 98 94
65 Jennifer Chang 260.524 98 94
66 Albane Valenzuela 260.472 98 94
67 Stacy Lewis 260.383 98 94
68 Leona Maguire 260.292 98 94
69 Peiyun Chien 260.284 98 94
70 Albane Valenzuela 260.246 98 94
71 Hyo Joon Jang 258.333 97 95
72 Pavarisa Yoktuan 258.258 97 95
73 Samantha Wagner 258.241 97 95
74 Nasa Hataoka 257.817 97 94
75 Ryann O’Toole 257.660 97 94
76 Jenny Shin 257.574 97 94
77 Sarah Schmelzel 257.317 97 94
78 Linnea Johansson 257.203 97 94
79 Lucy Li 256.984 97 94
80 Wichanee Meechai 256.969 97 94
81 Ines Laklalech 256.762 97 94
82 Jeongeun Lee5 256.750 97 94
83 Jin Young Ko 256.741 97 94
84 Morgane Metraux 256.360 96 94
85 Gina Kim 256.299 96 94
86 Ariya Jutanugarn 256.268 96 94
87 Sung Hyun Park 255.861 96 94
88 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 255.722 96 94
89 Wei-Ling Hsu 255.647 96 94
90 Megan Khang 255.586 96 94
91 Pajaree Anannarukarn 255.553 96 94
92 Matilda Castren 255.528 96 94
93 Albane Valenzuela 255.403 96 94
94 Sophia Schubert 255.378 96 94
95 Jaravee Boonchant 255.190 96 93
96 Elizabeth Szokol 255.114 96 93
97 Aline Krauter 254.946 96 93
98 Paula Reto 254.780 96 93
99 Azahara Munoz 254.681 96 93
100 Karis Davidson 254.363 96 93
101 Annie Park 254.255 96 93
102 Grace Kim 254.133 96 93
103 Pornanong Phatlum 254.042 96 93
104 Gabriella Then 253.820 95 93
105 Rose Zhang 253.385 95 93
106 Celine Boutier 252.980 95 93
107 Dani Holmqvist 252.872 95 93
108 Eun-Hee Ji 252.712 95 93
109 Lauren Stephenson 252.426 95 92
110 Kelly Tan 252.424 95 92
111 Narin An 252.389 95 92
112 Moriya Jutanugarn 252.161 95 92
112 Arpichaya Yubol 252.157 95 92
114 Lydia Ko 251.711 95 92
115 Lauren Coughlin 251.396 95 92
116 Allisen Corpuz 251.085 94 92
117 Jeongeun Lee6 150.736 57 55
118 Yu-Sang Hou 250.732 94 92
119 Olivia Cowan 249.527 94 91
120 Jing Yan 249.500 94 91
121 Mina Harigae 249.359 94 91
122 Ashleigh Buhai 249.310 94 91
123 Min Lee 249.296 94 91
124 Jennifer Song 249.096 94 91
125 Sarah Kemp 248.981 94 91
126 Hyo Joo Kim 248.872 94 91
127 Celine Borge 248.683 93 91
128 Maddie Szeryk 248.586 93 91
129 Jennifer Chang 248.523 93 91
130 Leona Maguire 248.418 93 91
131 Allison Emrey 248.310 93 91
132 Hinako Shibuno 248.296 93 91
133 Jasmine Suwannapura 247.963 93 91
134 Lindsey Weaver-Wright 247.953 93 91
135 Anna Nordqvist 247.825 93 91
136 Magdalena Simmermacher 247.327 93 91
137 Caroline Inglis 247.114 93 91
138 Marina Alex 247.016 93 90
139 Cheyenne Knight 246.207 93 90
140 Su Oh 245.897 92 90
141 Muni He 245.542 92 90
142 Ayaka Furue 245.443 92 90
143 Emma Talley 245.317 92 90
144 In Kyung Kim 245.185 92 90
145 Haeji Kang 245.081 92 90
146 Haru Moon 244.909 92 90
147 Marissa Steen 244.407 92 90
148 Gemma Dryburgh 244.321 92 89
149 Aditi Ashok 244.310 92 89
150 Paula Creamer 244.143 92 89
151 Chella Choi 244.068 92 89
152 Bronte Law 243.862 92 89
153 Yuna Nishimura 243.615 92 89
154 Christina Kim 243.471 92 89
155 Charlotte Thomas 243.017 91 89
156 Stacy Lewis 242.877 91 89
157 Danielle Kang 242.684 91 89
158 So Yeon Ryu 241.217 91 88
159 In Gee Chun 241.008 91 88
160 Andrea Lee 240.385 90 88
161 Brittany Altomare 239.655 90 88
162 Lizette Salas 238.775 90 87
163 Yaeeun Hong 237.654 89 87
164 Dana Fall 236.767 89 87
165 Dottie Ardina 235.934 89 86

It’s our belief that LPGA Tour players could actually be competitive on men’s professional tours provided they work on getting faster through a swing speed training like we have here at Swing Man Golf through All-Access.

START NOW WITH ALL-ACCESS


The slowest player on the PGA TOUR each year is always close to 104-105 mph. Based on that, for any LPGA Tour player to be competitive in a male event, she would need more speed.

How fast are the swing speeds at the World Long Drive Championships?


At the Professional Long Driver level, Trackman® data that I’ve previously found from 2009 to 2017 showed us the following average club head speed numbers for the entire field at the World Long Drive Championships is about 135 mph. That seems to be increasing in years since.

That means that a typical long driver is over 20 mph faster than the average PGA TOUR player from that period…and over 10 mph faster than some of the tour’s fastest swingers like Cameron Champ, Bubba Watson, Dustin Johnson, Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy, etc.

Historically, no player on the PGA TOUR would stand a chance of winning (or even being competitive) at the World Long Drive Championships…not until 2021 when Bryson DeChambeau was invited to compete at the 2021 PLDA World Championships and finished in the Final 8.

The event was a limited field event due to COVID-19. However, Bryson’s fastest ball speed during competition that I recall seeing was 219 mph, which would put his club head speed on that swing at 146 mph.

In 2022, Bryson finished 2nd.

As we’ll see below, that’s fast enough to win the entire World Long Drive Championships.

He also added more fat and muscle weight and worked far harder than necessary to increase his swing speed. That’s a story I already wrote about for GolfWRX.com.

Let’s look at how fast a typical Final-8 long driver can historically swing.

Swing Speed Chart for the World Long Drive Championships – Final-8 Competitor

Year

Average Swing Speed

Peak Swing Speed

2009 141 mph 150 mph
2010 143 mph 150 mph
2012 141 mph 149 mph
2015 141 mph 151 mph
2016 139 mph 149 mph
2017 145 mph 157 mph

Swing Speed Chart for the Final-8 Competitors World Long Drive Championships

Here are some average speeds of a few individual Final-8 competitors.

Name

Average Swing Speed

Year

Jeremy Easterly 133 mph 2015
Tom Peppard 134 mph 2012
Mitch Dobbyn 134 mph 2016
Jeff Crittenden 136 mph 2015
Jeff Gavin 136 mph 2015
Trent Scruggs 136 mph 2012
Jeff Crittenden 137 mph 2016
Justin Moose 137 mph 2016
Justin Young 138 mph 2012
Domenic Mazza 139 mph 2010
Ryan Steenberg 139 mph 2016
Ryan Cooper 140 mph 2012
Jermie Montgomery 140 mph 2010
Josh Crews 140 mph 2012
Patrick Hopper 140 mph 2010
Paul Howell 140 mph 2017
Tim Burke (2013 & 2015 World Champion) 141 mph 2017
Will Hogue 143 mph 2017
Kevin Shook 143 mph 2010
Jason Eslinger 143 mph 2015
Justin James 143 mph 2016
Landon Gentry 144 mph 2012
Joe Miller (2010 & 2016 World Champion) 145 mph 2016
Wes Patterson 145 mph 2017
Kyle Berkshire (2019 World Champion) 145 mph 2017
Joe Miller (2010 & 2016 World Champion) 145 mph 2016
Bryson DeChambeau 146 mph 2021
Jamie Sadlowski (2008-9 World Champion) 146 mph 2012
Ryan Louw 146 mph 2010
Tim Burke (2013 & 2015 World Champion) 146 mph 2015
Nick Kiefer 147 mph 2017
Ryan Winther (2012 World Champion) 147 mph 2012
Mitch Grassing 148 mph 2017
Jamie Sadlowski 148 mph 2015
Justin James (2017 World Champion) 150 mph 2017
Connor Powers 153 mph 2014

Realistically, to win the World Long Drive Championships, you have historically needed to be swinging in the mid-140s. The average champion was about 146 mph based on 7 champions from 2009-2017.

A champion long driver would easily drive it 50 yards past a guy like Bubba Watson. In fact, this actually happened in Hawaii in 2011 ahead of the PGA TOUR event when Jamie Sadlowski hit drives at Kapalua in Maui against Bubba Watson, Dustin Johnson, and Robert Garrigus. It wasn’t even close.

Occasionally, you’d see guys get in to the Final-8 at the World Championships that average in the 130s. Typically when that happened, they were better fit for their equipment, they were more mentally strong, they took better advantage of wind conditions, and things like that. As you can see, it was very difficult to win swinging in the 130s, though.

If memory serves, Carl Wolter won the 2011 World Championships in the high 130s. That year there were very strong tail winds and Carl presumably hit a better wind ball (usually higher and with more spin) than two other champions he beat head-to-head, Jamie Sadlowski and Joe Miller…both of whom have swung 150 mph in competition.

Unfortunately, full data since then isn’t available in the same way due to inconsistencies in who was owning and hosting the world championships (Ex. Long Drivers of America, Comcast, PLDA, GF Sports and Entertainment)r, but the various winners of those years since (2017 – Justin James, 2018 – Maurice Allen, 2019 Kyle Berkshire, 2020 – No World Championship, 2021 – Kyle Berkshire, 2022 – Martin Borgmeier, 2023 Kyle Berkshire) have all achieved speeds over 150 mph at the World Championships.

However, as mentioned, long drive swing speed seem to be trending upwards.

In 2023, World Long Drive reported a World Long Drive Championship group average ball speed for the Final 16 of 215.7 mph, with Kyle Berkshire at the top with 226.2 mph. Assuming 1.5 smash factor, that’d be averaging 143.8 mph and 150.8 mph of swing speed, respectively.

Also, through 2023, in training, 8 hitters had broken the 230-mph ball speed mark, when the previous record mark had been 227 mph for years, with 3 over 240 mph. To get 230 mph ball speed, you need at least 153 mph swing speed. To break 240 mph, it’s a minimum of 160 mph.

As far as I know, Sam Attanasio has the current ball speed training swing at 243.0 mph, which would necessitate at least 162 mph of club head speed. Seb Waddell has a training swing on a Trackman® at 169.6 mph swing speed.

Let me know if these get broken and I can update what is here.

At the Senior (Over 45 years old) level, in 2012 a Senior division Final-8 competitor averaged 131 mph with a peak of 137 mph. Two-time Senior World Champion “Fast” Eddie Fernandes (2018 & 2022) has previously achieved 156 mph of club head speed and 228 mph of ball speed.

Even the “old” guys can bomb it past any PGA TOUR player.

So, as you can see, the more swing speed you have, in general the farther you will drive the ball…and as I’ve shown, more distance also makes it easier to shoot lower scores.

Can you Increase Your Average Golf Swing Speed?

Aside from improving your technique and getting fit for your equipment, despite what many golfers (even pros like Tiger) believe, yes, you can actually train to increase your swing speed…at any age!

Just consider a long drive guy like Bobby Wilson. At the age of 53, he could swing over 12 mph faster than the PGA TOUR’s “long hitting” Bubba Watson.

Also note that just because you are fit does not mean you are fast. Camilo Villegas was arguably more “fit” than John Daly, but John could swing faster. Granted, some of this is due to John’s technique, equipment, etc…but the point is that although fitness certainly has its place in golf and life, for distance and application towards becoming a better player…it’s more about being fast than fit.

Swing Man Golf Helps You Increase Your Average Golf Swing Speed!

Rapidly and drastically unleash your power and play consistently with a steady and reliable game with Swing Man Golfs All-Access…featuring effective and easy-to-understand world class golf instruction paired with our expertise in long drive and our pioneering golf fitness swing speed training programs for amateurs and pros alike.

Swing Man Golf is a 2021 Golf Fitness Association of America Award Winner for it's work in golf fitness and swing speed training
Swing Man Golf is a 2022 Golf Fitness Association of America Award Winner for it's work in golf fitness and swing speed training
Swing Man Golf is a 2023 Golf Fitness Association of America Award Winner for it's work in golf fitness and swing speed training

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Certification is also available for motivated PGA pros and fitness trainers.

We’ve got junior golfers from 12 years old to men on up in to their 80s with handicaps ranging from pro to 30+ who add an average of 12-16 mph (30-40 yards) of driver swing speed in their first month of basic training. Believe it or not, we’ve even had several golfers who were willing to do the work that gained over 30 and 40 mph (that’s not a typo) over the course of a few months.

One of these golfers was 58 years old!

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Get a taste of what’s available in All-Access with this video about a week-long swing speed training workout you can do at home!

START NOW WITH ALL-ACCESS